Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Find: Indystate - why is the ios device majority the network traffic minority? The Android engagement paradox

Because the online mobile experience isn't as engaging.

The Android engagement paradox

IBM’s Digital Analytics Benchmark reported US Black Friday sales and the news is reasonably good. Overall online sales grew by 17.4% while mobile grew to make up 24% of traffic.

The data goes further to show the split between device types. I illustrate this split with the following graphs:

Of the 24% of traffic made up by mobile devices, phones contributed 13% and tablets 11% (or 54% and 46% of mobile respectively). Of the phone traffic, iOS devices were about two thirds of traffic and Android one third. Of tablet traffic, iPad was 88%, Kindle and Nook were 5.5% Galaxy Tab was 1.8% and other tablets were 4.4%.

Overall, iOS was 77% generated mobile traffic and Android (excl. Kindle, Nook) was 23%.

That’s an interesting snapshot of the consumption of mobile devices, but is there a pattern here? I also took a look at the same data from 2011 and 2010.



Besides the pattern of significant mobile growth (from 5.2% to 24% of online in two years) there is the curious effect of iOS growth outpacing Android growth. Android went from 1.43% of Black Friday shopping traffic in 2010 to 4.92% in 2012. In same time iOS went from 3.85% to 18.46%. In other words, while Android is up by a factor of 3.4, iOS is up by a factor of 4.8.

The reason is evident in the graphs above: the iPad is now the predominant mobile shopping device. You can observe the pattern in the following graph:

Sunday, November 25, 2012

Find: How mobile is taking over our computing load, hour by hour

How mobile is taking over our computing load, hour by hour

Although mobile has been coming on strong as a primary means of computing, it still lags overall desktop internet usage. But for some publishers who started on the web, there are already moments during the week when mobile drives the majority of traffic or sales.

Guardian

The Guardian’s traffic by hour

The Guardian’s Anthony Sullivan, group product manager for Guardian Core products at Guardian News & Media, said Monday that mobile — both smartphones and tablets — now contributes about 35 percent of traffic overall. That’s up from 10 percent at the start of 2011, when it was primarily smartphone traffic. (See disclosure below)

But at 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. in the morning local time, the Guardian gets more traffic from mobile devices. It also sees more mobile visitors than desktop visitors on Saturdays at 3 p.m. when the Premier League is under way.

Meanwhile, online design store Fab.com said late last month that on Saturdays between 12:00 a.m. and 6 a.m. local time, it sees 53 percent of its sales from mobile devices. On recent weekends, sales from mobile devices are now up to 40 percent, with weekend mornings before noon leading the way. Saturday evenings are also very popular with mobile users, with 44 percent of users buying on mobile devices between 6 p.m. and midnight.

The numbers are still early and these two properties are pretty popular with mobile users. Sullivan said in a Guardian story that the tipping point in favor of mobile might still be two years away. Fab’s CEO and co-founder Jason Goldberg, however, said based on the fast growth of mobile sales, he believes that Fab will see more parts of the day in which traffic from mobile devices goes over 50 percent in the coming months. And he said mobile will contribute more sales than desktop on certain days “soon.” Currently, 33 percent of Fab’s sales come from mobile devices.

The numbers underscore why mobile is so powerful. And it highlights the continuous nature of computing these days. The reality is today we are constantly on some type of computer throughout the day, moving back and forth between devices for different tasks and different settings. Mobile devices fill in the times when reaching for a laptop or desktop is more difficult, including early mornings, during lunch, as we settle in for the night and during the weekends....

Saturday, November 24, 2012

Find: Ouch! Nokia head of cameras and imaging Damien Dinning has left the company (updated)

Land rover??

Nokia head of cameras and imaging Damien Dinning has left the company (updated)

Nokia 808 PureView

Damien Dinning, a Nokia executive who headed up the company's imaging department, has left the company. Dinning previously worked with Nikon and then oversaw the release of the Nokia N8, the 808 PureView, and the Lumia 920 — three phones with category-leading cameras at the time of their launch. Nokia's cameras and imaging strengths have been a particular focus for the manufacturer as it moved over to Windows Phone devices last year as a way to differentiate its handsets from the competition. There's no word yet on Dinning's next move, but Dinning tweeted a few days ago that he was "incredibly excited" about something happening on December 10th that has nothing to do with Nokia directly — we'll see if he reveals his next move then.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Find: RIM CEO Thorsten Heins: 'we have this one shot with BlackBerry 10'

They have good aim, but can they execute?

RIM CEO Thorsten Heins: 'we have this one shot with BlackBerry 10'

Thorsten Heins interview

RIM CEO Thorsten Heins has spent the past week on a media blitz, speaking to multiple outlets about his plans for the BlackBerry 10 launch on January 30th. RIM will be missing the important holiday shopping season with that launch date, so it's no surprise to see Heins making the rounds. The good news for RIM is that Heins is a relatively open and candid CEO — especially compared to his predecessors — and not afraid to drop a hint or two about the company's future plans.

We sat down with Heins to discuss the current state of BB10 and RIM's plans for the launch, and we managed to gather a few of the aforementioned hints about ambitious plans for "mobile computing." RIM wants to do more than just survive in the smartphone space....

Find: Who wants a Firefox phone? Take a visual trip through Firefox's mobile OS

A completely open source mobile os will be nice. 

Who wants a Firefox phone? Take a visual trip through Firefox's mobile OS

Over a year ago, Mozilla announced its plans to work on its own mobile operating system, dubbed Firefox OS. The company officially made a prototype simulator available for developers and anyone curious enough to play around with it (though it's still in early alpha). The OS does take some of Android’s core functionality so it works on Android-capable handsets, but Mozilla also built the UI and application stack around Gecko, the Firefox HTML rendering engine.

While the advent of yet another mobile operating system might seem a little redundant, what with webOS and Chrome OS already in the wild, Firefox OS is actually a good thing. Though there are already a number of existing open source software projects with the same goal, Mozilla's is based on B2G, or Boot to Gecko. The platform is entirely based on standards-based Web technologies (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript) and this makes the barrier to entry for developers quite low. By publishing the code and the OS simulator now, Mozilla opens the door for developers to begin making applications for it.

Though it’s not technically a 1.0 release, the simulator will make it easier for developers to stay current with future updates to Firefox OS. It's easy to install—all you have to do is download the file from Mozilla and then right-click and open it up in the latest version of Firefox. The browser will then install the Simulator as an add-on. Once it's finished, you'll be able to launch the simulator yourself with a one-click button.

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Find: Imagination Technologies buys MIPS, hopes to compete with ARM processors

Arm gpu designer buys old line cpu maker. Must be for the patents, otherwise I see little connection. 

Silicon shakeup: Imagination Technologies buys MIPS, hopes to compete with ARM processors

Imagination Technologies PowerVR devices stock press 1200

Two companies you've probably never heard of have struck a deal that could help shape the future of the processor industry. Imagination Technologies, whose PowerVR GPUs power every Apple iPad and iPhone, the PlayStation Vita, loads of Intel Atom chips and a great many Android devices as well, has agreed to buy CPU designer MIPS for $60 million. Remember when AMD bought ATI? It's a little bit like that, but for mobile and embedded devices.

Typically, Imagination's graphics are baked into silicon alongside an ARM-based processor, but ARM has been threatening to steal some graphics customers as of late, putting its own Mali GPUs into Samsung products like Google's Nexus 10 tablet. With this deal, Imagination could theoretically compete.

Find: Imagination Technologies buys MIPS, hopes to compete with ARM processors

Arm gpu designer buys old line cpu maker. Must be for the patents, otherwise I see little connection. 

Silicon shakeup: Imagination Technologies buys MIPS, hopes to compete with ARM processors

Imagination Technologies PowerVR devices stock press 1200

Two companies you've probably never heard of have struck a deal that could help shape the future of the processor industry. Imagination Technologies, whose PowerVR GPUs power every Apple iPad and iPhone, the PlayStation Vita, loads of Intel Atom chips and a great many Android devices as well, has agreed to buy CPU designer MIPS for $60 million. Remember when AMD bought ATI? It's a little bit like that, but for mobile and embedded devices.

Typically, Imagination's graphics are baked into silicon alongside an ARM-based processor, but ARM has been threatening to steal some graphics customers as of late, putting its own Mali GPUs into Samsung products like Google's Nexus 10 tablet. With this deal, Imagination could theoretically compete.

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Find: idc's indystate - Android hits 75 percent market share for smartphones

Apple at 16, everyone yes at single digits. 

Android hits 75 percent market share for smartphones

Android goes Google's Android software for mobile devices was running on 75 percent of smartphones shipped in the third quarter, as the search company extended its lead over Apple, according to research firm IDC.

Find: Carriers switch on stolen cellphone database

Ok. Well that took too long to do. 

AT&T and T-Mobile switch on stolen cellphone database (update: Verizon and Sprint too)

cell tower stock 1024

AT&T and T-Mobile have introduced a database that will track stolen cellphones and keep them from being used on the carriers' networks. All four major US carriers agreed to contribute to the database back in April; CTIA executive Chris Guttman-McCabe told IDG News that AT&T and T-Mobile have collaborated first because their GSM networks are essentially interchangeable.

"The goal is to not only protect the consumer by cancelling the service, but by ultimately protecting the consumer by drying up the after market for stolen phones."

It's not clear when Verizon and Sprint will introduce their own efforts, but all four carriers will operate a combined database by the end of November next year. The database records the unique IMEI...

Friday, November 2, 2012

Find: Pirates are pillaging $10B apps store markets

Surprised it took this long. 

Pirates are pillaging $10B apps store markets

Online PiracyLong the scourge ofthe movie, music and video-game industries, pirates have turned their attention to apps, making a significant dent in
mobile-app store sales.